Social Security Bankruptcy Forecast

I’m going to tell you why the forecast on the much discussed “social security insolvency date” may be wrong. Benefit cuts could come sooner than expected or maybe even not at all. Keep reading to find out more.

I’m going to tell you why the forecast on the much discussed “social security insolvency date” may be wrong. Benefit cuts could come sooner than expected or maybe even not at all. Keep reading to find out more.

Forecasting the Future

We’ve all heard that, in the year 2034, Social Security benefits will be cut unless reforms are made. I’ve spent a lot of time on this channel covering these reforms. We’ve talked about the Social Security 2100 Act, Bernie Sanders plan, the plan to increase full retirement age and a few other things. All of these plans are based on the premise that the SS trust fund is running out of money. When it does, the incoming payroll taxes will only be enough to cover about 75% of the amount needed to fulfill expected benefit payments.

If the trust fund does run out of money, and no reforms are made, benefit checks will be cut because the law prohibits the SSA from borrowing money to make benefit payments. But how do we know when this will happen? The talked about date is 2034, but where did that forecast come from and is it possible that they are wrong? 

If you pull out your 2018 Social Security Trustees report…all 270 pages of it, you’ll see that they make a series of assumptions that lead them to this projected date.

Broadly speaking, the assumptions fit into three categories: Demographic Assumptions, Economic Assumptions, and Program Specific Assumptions.

Demographic Assumptions

There are a lot of different assumptions under these categories but really only a few that are contributory to the longevity of the trust fund. Within each of these narrowed down assumptions, the trustees look at three scenarios.

High Cost Scenario

The first scenario is the high cost scenario, evaluating what if this specific category doesn’t contribute as much as expected to the trust fund, or takes more from the trust fund than expected.

Low Cost Scenario

The low cost scenario is where the category adds to the trust fund or doesn’t take as much as expected from the trust fund. For example, the first demographic assumption is on fertility rates. If fertility rates increase, there will be more individuals to pay into the trust fund. So an increased child per woman rate would move the needle towards the low cost.

Fertility Rates

If women start having fewer babies than projected, it would mean that fewer future taxes are coming in and would move the needle to the higher cost assumption.

So, let’s take just a minute and look at the other sub categories that contribute the most. Still under the demographic category, we have mortality rates. If people live longer, checks have to be paid out longer, thus moving this toward the higher cost. If life expectancies go down, it would move towards the lower cost side.

Immigration

Then there’s immigration. If the rate of immigrants increases, there will be more workers paying payroll taxes and move the needle toward the low cost scenario. If the immigration rate decreases, there will be less taxes paid in.

Economic Assumptions

One of the most important categories is the economic assumptions.  I won’t take the time to go through all of these but I’ll highlight two.

Inflation

There are a number of ways that inflation could affect the economy, but the most direct impact to Social Security (“SS”) is through the Cost of Living Amount (“COLA”) adjustments. The SS COLA is based on Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (“CPI-W”), which is tied directly to inflation.

If inflation increases, the COLA on benefits will be more than anticipated driving the cost up.

If inflation is lower than expected, more money can stay in the trust fund…thus a low-cost scenario.

Unemployment Rates

Obviously, if fewer people are unemployed, there are a number of impacts but one that’s clear is less revenue coming into the trust fund in the form of payroll taxes.

If more people are working, there will be more revenue in payroll taxes.

Now this is one that we could hear more about in the short term. Here’s why: the trustees’ report currently have the high cost scenario at 6.5% unemployment, the intermediate cost is 5.5% and the low cost is 4.5%. But when you look at the actual numbers, we are at 4% unemployment right now and have been for over a year. Now the trustees want an average so one year isn’t enough for them to change their assumptions, but if it continues to stay low, it will bode well for the trust funds longevity. 

Longterm Effect of Disability Benefits

Under the program specific assumptions there are a whole slew of sub categories, but really only one that has a lot of impact and that is the incidence of disability awards. Because a disability benefit is equal to a full retirement age benefit, and is usually paid out for a lot longer than a retirement benefit, the cost will increase substantially if disability awards increase. The trustees are actually predicting that disability benefit awards will increase by around 20%  over the next few years. If it’s more than that the cost will be higher, and the inverse will be true if its lower than projected. 

The Moving Variables

If any of these swing in the low cost direction, it will lengthen the life of the trust fund. If several swing in the low cost direction…it’s possible that it could last forever. However, I’m not endorsing for people to plan for a best case scenario, we need to plan for the worst and go from there.

I still think reform is going to be needed. The point I’m trying to make is that nothing is certain and right now no one really knows when the trust fund will be empty.

It’s Your Retirement!

I want to thank you for taking the time to get informed. So many people rely on hope that everything will work out. Sometimes it does, but sometimes a lack of planning can ruin what should be your best years. This is your retirement! Please continue to stay informed! 

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day.

Social Security Scam Alert!

In 2018, a Social Security scam cost seniors millions of dollars. The scammers recognized a winning formula and have doubled down in 2019. I don’t want you or anyone you care about to get caught up in this. Keep reading; I am going to tell you how you can avoid being victimized by this scam!

In 2018, a Social Security scam cost seniors millions of dollars. The scammers recognized a winning formula and have doubled down in 2019. I don’t want you or anyone you care about to get caught up in this. Keep reading; I am going to tell you how you can avoid being victimized by this scam!

Social Security Scams Over Time

There are some scams that have a longer life than others. The most recent Social Security scam has been around since about 2017 and has started to explode. The numbers of those affected by this increased ten-fold in 2018 and 2019 is already on its way to being even bigger than 2018.

In 2018, a Social Security scam cost seniors millions of dollars. The scammers recognized a winning formula and have doubled down in 2019. I don’t want you or anyone you care about to get caught up in this. Keep reading; I am going to tell you how you can avoid being victimized by this scam!

There’s nothing incredibly new or savvy about this scam, but it’s working better than most. That’s probably because it’s being aimed at those who count on Social Security payments to buy food, pay for utilities and other necessities.

The Scam

The phone rings, and the person on the other side tell you your social security number has been suspended, and you need to talk to them to get it straightened out. When you talk to them, they’ll have to “verify your identity” and in the process gather all sorts of personally identifiable information that will allow them to get to your money.

Currently, there are two version of this scam. Here’s how the first sounds. 

“YOU HAVE RECEIVED THIS PHONE CALL FROM OUR DEPARTMENT TO INFORM YOU THAT WE HAVE JUST SUSPENDED YOUR SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER BECAUSE WE HAVE JUST FOUND SOME SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY. SO IF YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT IT…”

This sounds like a pre-recorded bot voice, not an actual person, and the computerized call will continue to tell you how to reach the “department”.

Then there’s the second version that ups the ante with the threat of arrest! The message is much like the first one, but the difference is that the voice says if you do not contact them immediately, they will issue an arrest warrant and arrest you for the suspicious activity.

Keep Yourself Safe

I understand why scams like these work. Sure, I may know better than to believe that computer generated robo-call, but to a generation that is not as familiar with technology, it could sound convincing and very scary!

Here are four things to remember:

Number 1…don’t trust your caller ID! In many cases these scammers appear to be calling from the Social Security administration’s phone number. There’s spoofing technology to make it appear that way.

In 2018, a Social Security scam cost seniors millions of dollars. The scammers recognized a winning formula and have doubled down in 2019. I don’t want you or anyone you care about to get caught up in this. Keep reading; I am going to tell you how you can avoid being victimized by this scam!

Second, the Social Security administration will NEVER threaten arrest.

In 2018, a Social Security scam cost seniors millions of dollars. The scammers recognized a winning formula and have doubled down in 2019. I don’t want you or anyone you care about to get caught up in this. Keep reading; I am going to tell you how you can avoid being victimized by this scam!

Third, a social security number can’t be suspended for any reason that I know of. They can suspend benefit payments, but not your social security number.

In 2018, a Social Security scam cost seniors millions of dollars. The scammers recognized a winning formula and have doubled down in 2019. I don’t want you or anyone you care about to get caught up in this. Keep reading; I am going to tell you how you can avoid being victimized by this scam!

Lastly, NEVER EVER EVER provide your social security number to any unknown individuals.

In 2018, a Social Security scam cost seniors millions of dollars. The scammers recognized a winning formula and have doubled down in 2019. I don’t want you or anyone you care about to get caught up in this. Keep reading; I am going to tell you how you can avoid being victimized by this scam!

If you are contacted by a scammer and want to make sure everything is ok here are three ways to find out:

First, contact the social security fraud hotline to report the contact.

Second, if you just want to make sure everything is fine with your benefit payments, call the main SSA number at 800-772-1213. If you want a shorter hold time you may want to just call your local office. You can find that number at ssa.gov/locator. 

In 2018, a Social Security scam cost seniors millions of dollars. The scammers recognized a winning formula and have doubled down in 2019. I don’t want you or anyone you care about to get caught up in this. Keep reading; I am going to tell you how you can avoid being victimized by this scam!

You may be in the same situation I’m in where you’re pretty sure that you’d never fall for this type of scam. But you may know someone who could be more vulnerable to this. Please share this article with everyone who needs to be aware.  

It’s Good To Be Proactive

You’re making a smart move by learning all you can and reading sites like these. It’s your retirement! If you know more about Social Security, and what retirement will look like for you, you will be in a better position to make sound decisions when it’s time. This is why I talk about Social Security … so you know what’s going on in the world around you.

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day.

Social Security Change of Address (3 different methods)

social security address change

If you’re receiving Social Security benefits or Medicare and have recently moved, your Social Security change of address needs to be high on your priority list.

The Social Security Administration makes it clear how important this is in their publication What You Need to Know When You Get Retirement or Survivors Benefits.

Even if you receive your benefits by direct deposit, Social Security must have your correct address so we can send letters and other important information to you. We’ll stop your benefits if we can’t contact you.

Ouch! You don’t want that to happen.

Thankfully, it’s pretty easy and painless to get your address changed. You just have to choose which of these three approaches will work best for you.

Continue Reading »

The Delay of Delayed Retirement Credits

Today we're taking about delayed retirement credits and how they get added to your benefit. If you plan to file after your full retirement age, you may be disappointed when you get your first check because those credits aren’t added right away.  Let me explain what you should expect and when to apply for benefits to minimize this delay.

Today we’re taking about delayed retirement credits and how they get added to your benefit. If you plan to file after your full retirement age, you may be disappointed when you get your first check because those credits aren’t added right away.  Let me explain what you should expect and when to apply for benefits to minimize this delay.

Why You May Be Missing Credits

It appears that the Social Security Administration have a little trick up their sleeves. They do not add your credits immediately if you file after full retirement age. Now, this is a little puzzling to me and I’m not sure why they do this. It’s not as if they don’t have the systems in place to do the calculations. After all, if you file early, the reductions are applied immediately!

I’m going to show you how this works but let me give you a little context around this first. I often discuss the monthly reductions for filing early or increases for filing early, and understanding that is a fundamental part of today’s discussion.

Today we're taking about delayed retirement credits and how they get added to your benefit. If you plan to file after your full retirement age, you may be disappointed when you get your first check because those credits aren’t added right away.  Let me explain what you should expect and when to apply for benefits to minimize this delay.

You can file for your retirement benefits between the ages of 62 and 70. If we imagine the red line is your full retirement age, your benefit is increased if you file after and decreased if you file before.

The decreases are broken up into two separate bands. First, you have the 36 month period immediately prior to full retirement age where benefits are reduced by .555% per month, and then anything more than 36 months, benefits are reduced by .417%.

What Happens If I File After My FRA?

If you file after your full retirement age, your benefit will be increased by .667% for every month. These increases are referred to as delayed retirement credits.

It’s important to understand that there is a difference in how the increases and reductions are applied. If you file at any time before your full retirement age, your benefit will be calculated by these reduction amounts and immediately reduced beginning with your first check. That is not the case for the increases.

Today we're taking about delayed retirement credits and how they get added to your benefit. If you plan to file after your full retirement age, you may be disappointed when you get your first check because those credits aren’t added right away.  Let me explain what you should expect and when to apply for benefits to minimize this delay.

In the operations manual, you can see there are two times retirement benefits are increased for delayed retirement credits. One is in the month you attain age 70 and the other is in January of the year following the year you earned the delayed retirement credits.

Should I File Before Or After My FRA?

Let me show you an example.

Let’s assume your birthday is in February, and you hit your full retirement age. Six months later you decide to file for benefits and you receive your first check in September. You’ve probably already calculated in your head that you should receive 6 months of delayed retirement credits which would work out to 4% increase to your full retirement age benefit. When you got your first check deposited in September, it may surprise you to see the check is THE SAME as if you would have filed in February. The delayed retirement credits would be added, but not until January of the following year and then you’d see it on your February check. And you don’t receive any sort of payment to make up for those months. 

One way to lessen the lag is to file later in the year. If you want to avoid this lag altogether, you could wait until your 70th birthday. Then, no matter what month it falls on, the delayed retirement credits are added immediately.

(Maybe in the future the Social Security Administration can figure out how to do this for any filing age after full retirement like they do before. It can’t be that hard, right?)

Take Action! It’s Your Retirement!

You’re making a smart move by learning all you can and reading sites like these, but don’t use this as specific advice for your own situation. I encourage you to do your research and talk to your own advisors. Most importantly, continue to educate yourself and stay curious!

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day.

Social Security Benefits: File Early And Invest It?

File early, invest the monthly benefit, and you'll be able to generate more income than someone who waited until later to file. Does it make sense to file early and invest the money?

We’re taking a look at the math behind a social security strategy that’s been around for a while. Here it is: File early, invest the monthly benefit, and you’ll be able to generate more income than someone who waited until later to file.

Effectively…you can do better on your own. But does it make sense to file early and invest the money?

A Decade of Positive Returns Creates Optimism in Investing

There’s nothing like a decade of positive returns in the market to create optimism for investing. We’re starting to see this optimism affect how individuals file for social security.

A few years ago, there weren’t many people saying they were big believers in the market. We were still recovering from the worst market since the Great Depression, and news was still (mostly) negative.

A few years later, individuals started seeing a few years of positive returns. Some of those have been double digit returns, and optimism began rising.

And so I’ve started to hear more people say things like “Devin, I think I could file early for Social Security, invest it, and create more income down the road than what I would’ve had with Social Security.”

So, You Think You Can Do Better?

Now, I’ve heard things like that for a while, but I’ve never gotten into the numbers to see what was really possible. So…I decided it was time for a closer look.

Let’s consider someone with a $2,000 benefit at their full retirement age. For this example, we’ll assume full retirement age is 67.

You can file as early as 62 and get $1,400 or as late as 70 and get $2,480.  

File early, invest the monthly benefit, and you'll be able to generate more income than someone who waited until later to file. Does it make sense to file early and invest the money?

Let’s look at two scenarios: First one is where you need to start your income at 67; and the other is where you need to start your income at 70.

In both cases, I’ll assume that you file for benefits at 62. That benefit has a 2% cost of living adjustment (COLA) applied and that you invest the monthly benefits check.

Here’s how that investment would accumulate at various rates of return from the beginning if age 62 to the beginning at age 67:

File early, invest the monthly benefit, and you'll be able to generate more income than someone who waited until later to file. Does it make sense to file early and invest the money?

First, let’s assume you didn’t make anything. That $1,400 would be worth $87,427. At 4, 6 and 8 percent it would gradually increase and the highest rate of return I assumed was 10 percent where your balance would be $116,985. These amounts would be the available balance to use in supplementing your income.

So now let’s look and see what the income gap would be after we adjust for the annual cost of living adjustments. Your benefit would start at $1,400, but by age 67, it would be approximately $1,546 if there was a 2% annual COLA.

The age 67 benefit was $2,000, but when you add the COLA to it, that amount would now be $2,208. So there would be an income gap of $662 that you would need to create from the invested Social Security benefits.

File early, invest the monthly benefit, and you'll be able to generate more income than someone who waited until later to file. Does it make sense to file early and invest the money?

I’m assuming there are two ways to generate this income. First, is an immediate lifetime annuity. This is the closest thing to your Social Security benefit in that it offers a fixed payment that’s guaranteed for your lifetime. The way these work is that you give a lump sum of money to an insurance company and they send you the payments. The other option I assumed was leaving your money invested and taking a 5% annual withdrawal to supplement the income.

And The Results Are In

Here were the results: If you need to generate an income stream of $662 per month, it would require an annuity of $115,539 and an investment portfolio of nearly $160,000.

File early, invest the monthly benefit, and you'll be able to generate more income than someone who waited until later to file. Does it make sense to file early and invest the money?

For the annuity, this would mean that you’d have to achieve an annual return of 10% and for the portfolio option you’d need to get a return of 21%.

Keep in mind…these are the returns needed to break even. You’d have to exceed that to do better that what you’d get with almost no risk from the Social Security administration. I’m not sure how you feel about your capabilities to get consistent investment returns like these, but if you can…maybe you should start a hedge fund. I can tell you that there’s no way I would take that chance with a client’s money. 

What If You Invest It For A Longer Period of Time… Does That Work Out?

But what if you have a longer time period?

Let’s say that you don’t need the income to start until you’re 70. In this scenario, you’d have from the beginning of age 62 to the beginning of age 70 to receive benefits and invest them. How would the time/value of money change the outcome?

By the time you take your age 70 benefit, it would have grown to $2,905 with an annual 2% cost of living adjustment. That’s an income gap of $1,265 you’d need to cover. Since you’d have a few additional years to invest, the balance of the investment portfolio would be higher than in the prior scenario ranging from 144,000 to 224,000 at 10% annual return.

File early, invest the monthly benefit, and you'll be able to generate more income than someone who waited until later to file. Does it make sense to file early and invest the money?

Now we know you may have saved, but how much would it take to replace $1,265?

You need an annuity of $200,000, and an investment portfolio of around $300,000. This means that for the annuity to work you’d need to get about a 7% return and for the portfolio to work you’d need about a 17% return.

File early, invest the monthly benefit, and you'll be able to generate more income than someone who waited until later to file. Does it make sense to file early and invest the money?

Again…those numbers are just to give you the dollar amount of income that you’d get from Social Security without taking hardly any risk. And, the risk is not the only difference here.

For example, the annuity options do not have survivor benefits, the taxation of an annuity vs. investment portfolio vs. social security is all different so the net amount would not be the same. The annuity options were calculated with today’s interest rates and there’s just no way to know what the interest rates would be in the future and how these annuities would be affected. The investment returns I illustrate are compounded annually and would be slightly different if compounded on a monthly basis. The amount of your social security benefit would also affect the required rate of return on the other options.

This article is based on what we know today with a set benefit amount, but your mileage may vary with your own circumstances.

It’s Your Retirement!

Ultimately, remember…I’m not your financial, legal or tax advisor. This article is meant to help educate you, but not as specific advice for your specific situation. I’d highly recommend that you keep learning and stay curious!

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day.

Are President Trump’s Economic Policies Saving Social Security?

The other day, a piece of economic data came out that is good news for the longevity of the Social Security trust fund. It could mean that the fund DOES NOT RUN DRY in 2034 as was previously forecast. I’ll tell you what it is and why its so important to watch this moving forward.

The other day, a piece of economic data came out that is good news for the longevity of the Social Security trust fund. It could mean that the fund DOES NOT RUN DRY in 2034 as was previously forecast. I’ll tell you what it is and why its so important to watch this moving forward.  

Trump Administration Policies Are Fixing Social Security

Not long ago I saw a headline that said something like “Trump Administration policies are fixing Social Security.” I couldn’t find the exact one I was looking for but it’s no secret that President Trump has long advocated that the fix is neither benefit cuts nor tax increases, and instead it’s a simple matter of growing the economy and everything will fall into place.  And there’s truth to that but we are getting so close to the point where even record setting economic numbers will be too little too late. But what we are seeing is promising!

The specific number I’m referencing is the unemployment rate. Economists believe this to be one of the most important economic indicators because of its far-reaching effect.

Unemployment Rate as a Factor

In the Social Security trustees’ report, they list the unemployment rate as one of the factors that will determine how long the funds last. In a very simplified explanation, this impacts the trust fund because with more people working, there are more taxes being paid into the social security trust fund. Thus, the retiree to worker ratio is improved.

Now, in this report they forecast an intermediate cost, high cost, and low cost scenario for all of the various factors.

The other day, a piece of economic data came out that is good news for the longevity of the Social Security trust fund. It could mean that the fund DOES NOT RUN DRY in 2034 as was previously forecast. I’ll tell you what it is and why its so important to watch this moving forward.

The intermediate cost is where they get the assumption that the SS trust fund will be dry by 2034. If the cost goes down, the trust fund will last longer. If the costs go up, it won’t last as long.

The intermediate cost assumption they are using for the unemployment rate is 5.5%. The lowest cost scenario they show is 4.5%. But, for the first time in a very long time, the unemployment rate has dipped below 4%.

As of the last report it was at 3.8%. If it stays down here for long, the Social Security trustees will have to revise their estimates.

What Does This Have To Do With President Trump?

So what does this have to do with President Trump?

Well, he’s the president while unemployment rates have been pretty impressive.

The other day, a piece of economic data came out that is good news for the longevity of the Social Security trust fund. It could mean that the fund DOES NOT RUN DRY in 2034 as was previously forecast. I’ll tell you what it is and why its so important to watch this moving forward.

Since 1969, unemployment rates for the year end have only gone under 4% twice. 2002 and 2018. The question is, is this a result of the policies of Donald Trump?

Yeah…I’m not about to answer that.

If you look at unemployment rates for the last decade, you can see that except for an increase at first, they’ve been coming down for the last nine years.

Is this because of the policies of president Obama? Could it be because of President Bush’s policies before President Obama was in office are finally being felt? We could take this back for decades.

The truth is, I think the President has less to do with the economy than we think. I mean, they don’t control monetary policy, so at best they have short term impacts on the stock market and an indirect effect on the economy.

The point is not to play politics or any of that nonsense. Its to remind you that these trustees’ reports are using assumptions THAT CAN and do CHANGE.  And as things change, you can count on me to let you know.

It’s Your Retirement!

Before we go, I want to thank you for taking the time to get informed. So many people rely on hope that everything will work out. Sometimes it does, but sometimes a lack of planning can ruin what should be your best years. This is your retirement! Please continue to stay informed! 

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day.

How To Calculate Your Social Security Benefits

Today, I want to show you how to easily calculate your Social Security benefit without a fancy calculator, software or help from someone who doesn’t really care if the information they give you is correct or not (like you may get at the Social Security Administration). With this article, you’ll know how to do this calculation on your own in just a few simple steps.

Today, I want to show you how to easily calculate your Social Security benefit without a fancy calculator, software or help from someone who doesn’t really care if the information they give you is correct or not (like you may get at the Social Security Administration). With this article, you’ll know how to do this calculation on your own in just a few simple steps.

Why Do I Need To Know How To Calculate My Benefits?

So you may be thinking, “Why do I need to know how to calculate my own Social Security benefits? After all, the SSA will give me an estimate at any time.”

That’s true! You can go to your My SSA account online and see an up-to-date copy of your benefits estimate. So why would you need to know how to do this calculation on your own?

It’s important for a few reasons.

First, it never hurts to understand the mechanics behind an income stream that’ll probably be a large part of your overall retirement income.

Secondly, the SSA makes projections about your future income as part of your benefits estimate.

On the benefits statement they say plainly that they assume your earnings will continue at the same level until your retirement age, and if they are different, your benefit will not match the estimate AND they “can’t provide your actual benefit amount until you apply for benefits.”

This all means that if your earnings are different than their projections, your benefit will not match the estimate.

So, understanding how to do this calculation is especially important if you plan to retire early or later than “normal” or if you have a significant earnings change in the last few years of working. 

Only Three Steps To The Calculation

To do this calculation, there are only three steps. Each step has some sub-steps as well.

First, you’ll need to find your Average Indexed Monthly Earnings, or AIME. Then you apply that AIME to the benefit formula and then adjust for filing age.

How To Calculate Your AIME

So let’s jump in with calculating your AIME. To do this, you’ll need to get set up with a tool like Excel, Google Sheets or just a notepad.

You’re going to need six individual columns with plenty of room underneath for your information. Set up your columns with the following headings: Year, Age, Actual Earnings, Indexing Factor, Indexed Earnings, Highest 35 Years

Today, I want to show you how to easily calculate your Social Security benefit without a fancy calculator, software or help from someone who doesn’t really care if the information they give you is correct or not (like you may get at the Social Security Administration). With this article, you’ll know how to do this calculation on your own in just a few simple steps.

The first two headings are the year and your age. Go all the way back to the first year you had earnings that were taxed for Social Security. You can find a complete record of this by going to your online SSA account and click the link that says “view earnings record.” If you don’t have an online account, it’s very easy to set one up.

Today, I want to show you how to easily calculate your Social Security benefit without a fancy calculator, software or help from someone who doesn’t really care if the information they give you is correct or not (like you may get at the Social Security Administration). With this article, you’ll know how to do this calculation on your own in just a few simple steps.

This may seem a little redundant to put the year and your age, but it’ll make another step a little easier.

Now you just need to copy down the information from the SS earnings history. You’ll want to use the part that says “your taxed Social Security earnings.” Don’t skip a year, even if there were no earnings. Just put a zero in.

Once you have all of your historical earnings recorded, it’s time to adjust them for inflation. The SSA uses an indexing factor to make sure your future benefit has kept up with inflation, but still based on your earnings.

Important note here…only your earnings through age 59 are indexed. All earnings at age 60 and beyond are used in the calculation at face value with no inflation adjustment applied.

Also…When you’re getting your indexing factors, you have to be careful to use the factors specific to your age. The easy way to get these is to visit the SSA web page on indexing factors.

At the bottom there is a box where you’ll put the year you turn 62. I know I said your earnings at 60 and beyond are not inflated, but their system is designed to give you your factors based on your age of first eligibility. So be sure to put the year you attain age 62 in this box. When you do, you’ll get indexing factors that you’ll need in the next step.

Indexing Factors

You’ll notice that the factor is 1 for the years you are 60 and 61.

Now that you have your indexing factors, just copy them on to the sheet. Be sure to keep your years matched up.

Once you have your indexing factors written down, you simply need to multiply your actual earnings by your indexing factor. This will give you your indexed earnings.

Now, all you have to do is extract the highest 35 years of indexed earnings.

NOTE: If you don’t have 35 years, and don’t plan to continue working, you’ll have to use zeros.

If you’re still working and don’t have 35 years, you’ll need to estimate what your future earnings will be and apply the indexing factors just as you would for actual historical earnings. This is where you can start to play around with the numbers to see the various impacts of retiring early, or working later or maybe having variable earnings close to retirement.

Your Highest Earnings

Once you have your highest 35 years in the last column, you just need to sum them up and divide by 420. You divide by 420 because that’s the number of months in 35 years and we need to get your average earnings expressed as a monthly number.

Once you do this, congratulations…you have your AIME and have finished the first (and hardest) step of the calculation. It’s downhill from here. 

Today, I want to show you how to easily calculate your Social Security benefit without a fancy calculator, software or help from someone who doesn’t really care if the information they give you is correct or not (like you may get at the Social Security Administration). With this article, you’ll know how to do this calculation on your own in just a few simple steps.

To keep walking through this example, I’ve assumed a certain amount of wages and years of work. When I do that calculation I get an AIME of $5,726.02. Yours will be different! This was simply the result of my example calculation and I needed an example to continue explaining this calculation. 

Time To Apply The Formula

Now that you have your AIME, it’s time to run it through the formula to see what your full retirement age benefit amount will be.

IMPORTANT NOTE HERE: This formula is calculated in the year you turn 62. That’s important because this formula is made up of two numbers that’s often referred to as bend points. These numbers change EVERY YEAR AND YOU HAVE TO USE THE BEND POINTS FOR THE YEAR YOU TURN 62 TO GET AN ACCURATE RESULT.

Let me show you a 2019 example and then I’ll talk you through how to get these for yourself if you don’t happen to be exactly 62 in 2019. 

Bend Points

In 2019, the bend points are $926 and $5,583. But the formula is calculated based on three separate percentages of different portions.

First you have the amount up to $926, then the amount between $926 and $5,583 and then the amount over $5,583. Three separate portions, but only two numbers.

Then you take your average indexed monthly earnings and apply it to the grid. Using the AIME number from my example, the first $926 would be used at 90%. The amount from $927 to $5,583 would be used at 32%. Anything over $5,583 would be used at 15%.

Today, I want to show you how to easily calculate your Social Security benefit without a fancy calculator, software or help from someone who doesn’t really care if the information they give you is correct or not (like you may get at the Social Security Administration). With this article, you’ll know how to do this calculation on your own in just a few simple steps.

Once I’ve ran my AIME through that grid, I simply sum up the far right column and the result is my full retirement age benefit also known as my PIA or primary insurance amount.

But what happens if you aren’t 62 yet? In that case you’ll have to forecast what bend points will be in the year you turn 62.

Thankfully…it’s not that hard because I have a calculator on my website.

The first thing you’ll want to enter is your year of birth. This will do the math for you to figure out how many years until you turn 62.

Then you need to put in the current year bend points. I’ve left this field unpopulated since they change every year.

To get the current year numbers, just click on the link for the SSA page that has these numbers. Just be sure to use the bend points for the PIA formula and not the family benefit formula.

Once you have the current bendpoints plugged in you need to decide how much inflation will occur. In my calculator you can choose 2, 3 or 4%. The Social Security trustees believe the average wage index will increase at around 4% per year, and this index is what controls the bend points, but you may choose to believe that’s too optimistic and want to use a lower number. This is completely up to you.

Once you hit calculate, you’ll see the future bendpoints below. This is what you would use in your formula. Keep in mind that the bendpoints change every year, but the percentages stay the same. 

One other thing…if you are beyond age 62 you can find the bend points for the year where you were 62 at that same link.

Now that you’ve calculated your average index monthly earnings and applied them to the PIA formula, you simply need to figure out how your filing age will impact your benefit amount.

Discovering Your Filing Age

The easy way to look at it is to think about it in annual numbers.

Your benefit will be lower if you file at 62 and higher if you file at 70. But there are three separate bands with different adjustment amounts.

The red line is your full retirement age. This is where you receive the amount of the benefit you calculated plus any cost of living adjustments that happen between now and then.

If you file after your full retirement age, your benefit will increase by 8% per year. If you file in the 3 year window immediately prior to your full retirement age your benefit will decrease by 6.66% per year of early filing. For anything more than 3 years before your full retirement age, your benefit will decrease by an additional 5%.

A lot of people don’t want to retire on their birthday so it’s important to break this down by a monthly amount.

Monthly Increase/Decrease Percentages

After your FRA, your benefit will be increased by .667% per month you delay. For the 36 month period before full retirement age your benefit is reduced by .556% and for more than 36 months it is reduced by .417% per month. 

Today, I want to show you how to easily calculate your Social Security benefit without a fancy calculator, software or help from someone who doesn’t really care if the information they give you is correct or not (like you may get at the Social Security Administration). With this article, you’ll know how to do this calculation on your own in just a few simple steps.

And that is it!

It’s your retirement!

Before we go I want to thank you for taking the time to get informed. So many people just float into retirement hoping everything will work out. Sometimes it does, but sometimes a lack of planning can ruin what should be your best years. This is your retirement! Please continue to stay informed! 

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day. 

The Republicans’ Plan To Save Social Security

How do the Republicans plan to save Social Security and keep it solvent for the generations to come? If you think a possible Social Security fix may only impact those with a high income, you need to check this out. This is a plan that will affect EVERYONE!  

Changes Are Necessary

Whatever your political affiliation is, I’m sure you’ll agree that SOMETHING needs to be done about Social Security. We are now within 15 years of facing the real possibility of benefit cuts. Most projections suggest that benefits will have to be cut by around 25% if nothing is done. Most people CANNOT afford this! 

In 2018, the average monthly social security benefit was $1,413. If that was cut by 25%…the average benefit would go down to $1,088. That’s only $77 dollars above the poverty line.

Needless to say, something needs to be done before this cut happens. While the wheels of change are moving PAINFULLY slow, both parties have suggested multiple fixes in an effort to ensure these cuts DO NOT happen. 

Which Way Will it Go?

In all of these proposals that have been suggested there are two that continue to come up over and over as the individual political party’s favorite:

How do the Republicans plan to save Social Security and keep it solvent for the generations to come? If you think a possible Social Security fix may only impact those with a high income, you need to check this out. This is a plan that will affect EVERYONE!

The Democrats would like to increase the taxable earnings cap. This would be a tax increase on higher income individuals. (More detail on this shortly.)

The Republicans’ plan that is most popular is to increase the full retirement age. Their rationale for this is that the full retirement age hasn’t been adjusted since the 1983 amendments and the system needs to adjust for increasing life expectancies. 

When you look at the data, they have a valid point. In 1940, life expectancy for a 65 year old was 76.9 years for a man and 78.4 years for a woman. Since that time, life expectancy has risen by more than six years for 65-year-olds, to 83.1 years for men and 85.6 years for women. So, a promise to provide retired workers with a certain monthly benefit for the rest of their lives is significantly more expensive than the same commitment made to recipients in 1940. 

Consequences of Change

Individuals are living longer and these payments are being paid for a lot longer. If you stop there, it makes lots of sense to raise the full retirement age as the Republicans are suggesting. However, as with everything, there would be a few unintended consequences.  

For example, if the full retirement age is increased, this means that the corresponding reduction for filing early would be much steeper as well.

Currently, if your full retirement age is 67, and you file at 62, you’ll receive 70% of your full retirement age benefit amount. If the FRA is raised to 70, and the reductions stay the same, an individual would only receive about 55% of their full retirement age benefit at 62. 

To put this into numbers, imagine that an individual’s full retirement age benefit is $1,413. If the FRA is 67, the penalty for filing at 62 would be $424 which would result in a benefit of $989. If the FRA was increased to 70, the penalty for filing at 62 would be $636, which would result in a benefit of $777. 

One of the big questions here is whether the filing behaviors would change. Currently, about 33 percent of all retirees simply file at the earliest age possible…age 62. If the increased penalties didn’t change this behavior, and individuals continued to file at the earliest age possible, we’d see more seniors with household incomes under the poverty line and possibly a further drain on other government programs to help meet their needs.  

How to Mediate the Issue

Some have suggested that the fix for this is to increase the minimum age of eligibility to around 65. If this happens, you could see a scenario where more individuals may begin to file for disability benefits—which are not reduced for filing age. This is because nearly half of all workers leave work earlier than they expected and 61% of those individuals cite health reasons.

This means that 30% of all workers are leaving work earlier than they want to for health reasons. If the only Social Security benefit that’s available in your early 60s is disability, I would expect those applications to skyrocket. IF the SSA saw a big uptick in the number of disability cases, it could easily dampen the effect of having increased the full retirement age.  

How Your Income Could Be Affected

Those opposed to the idea of increasing the full retirement age say that though raising the retirement age affects everyone  equally in a rough sense, as it affects  incomes  unequally. This is because those with a low income tend to depend on the income from Social Security MORE than those with a high income. 

(This is one of the reasons that the Democrats say they will not accept this as a standalone plan because the impact would be greatest on lower income individuals.)   

My opinion is that the full retirement age WILL BE increased as part of the overall solution to shore up the trust fund. How much it will increase is likely the only question that remains. I suspect that it will only be raised by a small amount and will take several years to get there.  So you can probably see by now that the fix isn’t as easy as it seems on the surface. But as new proposals are made, I’ll be sure to keep you informed.  

Stay Informed!

I want to thank you for taking the time to get informed. Being informed gives you choices – and can make a big difference in YOUR RETIREMENT! Please continue to stay informed! 

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day. 

The $37,983 Social Security Mistake

Whether you are close to retirement, or in your early working years, there is a step that you need to take today. It can’t wait! If you ignore this it could cost you THOUSANDS of dollars in missed Social Security benefits. And its just a small little step that will take less than 5 minutes. I’ll tell you what this mistake is and the steps you need to take TODAY to avoid it. #Mistakes on Earning

Whether you are close to retirement, or in your early working years, there is a step that you need to take today. It can’t wait! If you ignore this it could cost you THOUSANDS of dollars in missed Social Security benefits. And its just a small little step that will take less than 5 minutes. I’ll tell you what this mistake is and the steps you need to take TODAY to avoid it. 

So what is this little step that you can take that may help you avoid a big reduction to your Social Security benefits? It’s a mistake in your Social Security earnings record. This earnings record is a history of your lifetime earnings that will be used for the purpose of calculating your Social Security benefit. 

Your Recorded Earnings

If your Social Security earnings have been recorded incorrectly, or worse…not at all…it could make a big difference in your benefit amount. 

Why is this such a big deal? It all goes back to how your benefit is calculated. The Social Security Administration uses your highest 35 years of earnings as a cornerstone of the benefit calculation. If any of these 35 years are incorrect, or missing altogether, the average is skewed. 

Mistakes in the Social Security earnings record are fairly common. For proof, look no further than the Earnings Suspense File. (This is where earnings reports are stored that have a mismatched name and SSN combination.) Since the inception of Social Security, there have been a total of $1.2 trillion in wages that could not be matched to an earnings record and thus were added to the Earnings Suspense File. In tax year 2012 alone, the Social Security Administration reported $71 billion added to the file!

Mistakes on Earnings

Why are there so many mistakes? Most of these mistakes are not the fault of the Social Security Administration. A good number of the mismatches are due to employer reporting errors or simple name changes after marriage or some other clerical error.  

Thankfully, the Social Security Administration has a pretty good system for figuring these mistakes out and assigning the earnings to the correct record. 

But nearly half of the mismatches are never corrected. Some of these are due to the fraudulent use of Social Security numbers where there simply is no fix. (For example, illegal immigrants using stolen SSNs to gain employment.)

The other mismatches are often legitimate earnings that just never get corrected. Unless you’re vigilant about monitoring your earnings record, you could have earnings gap that could have a substantial impact on your Social Security benefit calculation.

And there is a time limit for getting this corrected, too. Unless you meet an exception, you have 3 years, 3 months and 15 days to fix an error. I want to come back and talk about those exceptions later…

How This Can Affect Your Benefit Amount

Let me give you an example of how this can affect your benefit amount:

I used the actual online calculator from the Social Security Administration. I love this calculator. It does have some limitations but as far as I’m concerned it’s the best calculator on the SSAs website.

If you want to follow along you can just go to the Online Calculator.

In the example calculation I ran, I simply assumed the following:

Individual has 35 years of earnings that started in 1984 and ended in 2018. Instead of going for a really high annual earnings amount, which would have exaggerate the effect, I assumed that this individual started in 1984 with a salary of 35K and had a 2% raise every year. Now this video is all about doing this calculation for yourself, and to do that you’ll need your own earnings history.

Under that assumption, this individual would have a full retirement age benefit of $2,418 dollars. So that’s the baseline.

What happens if earnings are missing? At random, I started at 1990. For one missing year, the benefit would decrease to $2,385 dollars. For two missing years, it would decrease to $2,353 dollars. For three, it would be $2,322. For four, it would be $2,291 and for five, it would be $2,260…a difference of $158 dollars per month. 

Whether you are close to retirement, or in your early working years, there is a step that you need to take today. It can’t wait! If you ignore this it could cost you THOUSANDS of dollars in missed Social Security benefits. And its just a small little step that will take less than 5 minutes. I’ll tell you what this mistake is and the steps you need to take TODAY to avoid it. #Mistakes on Earning

So you may be thinking…Devin…that doesn’t sound like such a crisis. But how would this affect you over your entire retirement?

If we take those same amounts and assume a annual cola of 2%, you’ll see that the effect is now measured by thousands of dollars. For one year, it’s nearly $8,000. For two, it’s over $15,000. For three, it’s slightly over $23,000. At four years, it’s more than $30,000, and at 5 years, it’s nearly $38,000. I don’t think anyone would willingly give up any of those amounts.

Whether you are close to retirement, or in your early working years, there is a step that you need to take today. It can’t wait! If you ignore this it could cost you THOUSANDS of dollars in missed Social Security benefits. And its just a small little step that will take less than 5 minutes. I’ll tell you what this mistake is and the steps you need to take TODAY to avoid it. #Mistakes on Earning

Hopefully you’ve seen the value of making sure this earnings record is correct…heres how you can check yours.

Go to ssa.gov/myaccount. Once you log in you should see “earnings record” in the right hand sidebar. Once you click that you’ll see a complete copy of your earnings history. It’s that easy. The hardest part is remembering the security questions when you log in.

So what happens if your earnings history isn’t right? If there’s a mistake, here’s how to correct it.

First, gather your proof of income. This could be from tax returns, W2s, 1099s and a few other documents. If you can’t find these…don’t let the SSA tell you that there’s nothing that can be done! In their manual, they state that an oral or written statement from the employer will serve as primary evidence of wages. Once you have this proof of income you simply need to contact the SSA. They may have you fill out a SSA-7008 or they may do it for you. Just call the main number or your local office. 

Earlier, I referenced a time limit for correcting an earnings record mistake. Generally speaking, it is 3 years 3 months and 15 days. There are exceptions and there’s one BIG exception that covers almost everything. They will revise the record to correct a mechanical, clerical or other obvious error. About the only time I interpret when an exception doesn’t apply is when you didn’t file your taxes before the time limit. You’ll still have to pay the SS taxes, you just won’t get credit. 

So you may be asking yourself, why all the fuss and urgency? Here’s why. Like many of the Social Security rules, the rule on time limits are broad and sometimes not completely understood by the technicians at the Social Security Administration. I’ve seen cases where there was a clear exception, but the technician refused to enter the earnings because they did not understand the rule. Thankfully, this client was able to get help from a financial planner who understood the rules and helped the client draft a request for review letter. A few weeks later, the earnings were back where they should be…on the client’s earnings history.

Listen…please do this small little step today. It could make a big difference to you and potentially your survivor benefits if you should pass away. 

Take Action!

Before we go I want to thank you for taking the time to get informed. Being informed gives you choices – and can make a big difference in YOUR RETIREMENT! Please continue to stay informed! 

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day. 

2021: The Year Social Security Changes Forever

Social Security benefits are changing forever at the end of 2020. Once the calendar rolls over to 2021, you’ll never be able to get as much in benefits.

Social Security benefits are changing forever at the end of 2020. Once the calendar rolls over to 2021, you’ll never be able to get as much in benefits. 

Full Benefits From Social Security

Under the original Social Security Act of 1935, workers had to reach age 65 to receive a full retirement benefit. This “full retirement age” was actually simply based on the fact that many state pension systems and the Railroad Retirement Benefit system used age 65, so, the Committee on Economic Security – the group that designed the US SS system – decided to go with an age that was already commonly used.  Just as a side note…they also considered using age 70, but ultimately decided that age 65 was more reasonable. 

The full retirement age didn’t change from the beginnings of SS all the way until 1983. (By the way, this was the other time in history where the SS trust fund faced a crisis and nearly ran out of money.) To keep this from happening, The NATIONAL COMMISSION ON SOCIAL SECURITY REFORM (which is more commonly referred to as the Greenspan Commission) made a series of recommendations to Congress about how to keep the program solvent for the next 50 years. 

Increasing the Full Retirement Age

One of their big recommendations was to increase the full retirement age to age 67. To make this change a little easier to digest, they recommended that the change only impact those who were more than 20 years away from full retirement age and that the change would gradually phase in over a period of 22 years. 

The first changes began by changing the age from 65 to 66. It stayed at 66 for 11 years. But now…it’s going up again. 

For those born between 1955 and 1959, the full retirement age will be somewhere between age 66 and 67. For everyone born in 1960 or later, the FRA will be 67 (for now). 

This takes us back to the beginning where I said that you’ll never be able to get as much in benefits in 2021 or later. Here’s why. 

For years we’ve used nice round numbers when calculating the impact of filing for social security benefits early, or later. We’ve said if you file at 62 you’ll get 75% of your FRA benefit amount and if you wait until 70 you’ll get 132% of your benefit amount. NOT ANYMORE! 

Because the increases and reductions are calculated on a monthly basis, once FRA increases, there will not be as many months for benefits to increase by. The inverse will also be true, the reductions for filing at the earliest age will be steeper because there will be more months between age 62 and full retirement age.  

This is why I stress understanding how to calculate the reductions and increases on a monthly basis.

How The Changes Will Affect Social Security Benefits

Social Security benefits are changing forever at the end of 2020. Once the calendar rolls over to 2021, you’ll never be able to get as much in benefits.

Here’s how this changes the benefits and reductions if we look at filing at the earliest age and at the latest age. 

Currently, the SS filing window is between 62 and 70. You can’t file before 62 and it doesn’t make sense to file after 70. 

So, for those born between 1943 and 1954, the FRA is 66, you are entitled to 100% of your benefit. You can file as early as 62, but you’ll only receive 75% of your benefit. If you file at 70 you’ll receive 132% of your benefit. Once the FRA starts moving up, it all changes. Once the changes are fully implemented, you’ll still be able to file at 62, but you’ll only receive 70% of your FRA and if you delay…your benefit will increase to 124% instead of 132%. 

Social Security benefits are changing forever at the end of 2020. Once the calendar rolls over to 2021, you’ll never be able to get as much in benefits.

It’s your retirement!

Many people just hope everything will work out in retirement. Sometimes it does, but sometimes a lack of planning can ruin what should be your best years. This is your retirement! Please continue to stay informed! 

I’d recommend staying connected with my content so you won’t miss anything. In many cases I’ll publish my newest stuff on YouTube and then share it on my Facebook page. Then my content team does their magic and cleans it up into an article for those who enjoy reading. (Again…the article is shared on my Facebook page.)

Be sure to subscribe to my site so you won’t miss any of the new content coming out, plus you will receive the blueprint version of my book for free. Alternatively, you can just head over to Amazon and buy the full version. I can’t guarantee this, but I’m pretty sure you’ll get more value than the $12 it costs.

Thanks for reading…have a great day.